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Paul Robeson

"Little Man, You've Had a Busy Day" (karaoke)

"Little Man, You've Had a Busy Day" (sheet music)


Evening breezes sighing,

Moon is in the sky.

Little man, it’s time for bed.

Daddy’s little hero

Is tired and wants to cry.

Now, come along and rest your weary head.

 

Little man, you’re crying.

I know why you’re blue.

Someone took your kiddy car away.

Better go to sleep now.

Little man, you’ve had a busy day.

 

Johnny won your marbles.

Tell you what we’ll do.

Dad’ll get you new ones right away.

Better go to sleep now.

Little man, you’ve had a busy day.

 

You’ve been playing soldiers.

The battle has been won.

The enemy is out of sight.

Come along there, soldier,

Put away your gun.

The war is over for tonight.

Time to stop your scheming.

Time your day was through.

Can’t you hear the bugle softly say,

"Time you should be dreaming"?

Little man, youve had a busy day.

 

Little man, you’re crying.

I know why you’re blue.

Someone took your kiddy car away.

Better go to sleep now.

Little man, you’ve had a busy day.

 

Johnny won your marbles.

Tell you what we’ll do.

Dad’ll get you new ones right away.

Better go to sleep now.

Little man, you’ve had a busy day.

 

You’ve been playing soldiers.

The battle has been won.

The enemy is out of sight.

Come along there, soldier,

Put away your gun.

The war is over for tonight.

Time to stop your scheming.

Time your day was through.

Can’t you hear the bugle softly say,

"Time you should be dreaming"?

Little man, youve had a busy day.


Comments

John Bernhart April 16, 2018 @12:20 pm

The lyrics indicate that a stereotypical boy of the 30s was still playing toy soldiers just as did young Winston Churchill 50 years previously. Apparently the difference between small late 18th century ears and the First World War has not affected such play. Humans are slow learners. My generation still played with metal armies in the 50s, but using WW2 tactics. Still, we had a much wider variety of play interests and opportunities than did the boy on the song. I have two 78s if this piece, both by big bands. One is American by the Islam jones orchestra, the other British by Ray Noble’s band. The British version is a faster tempo and lighter feel, musically. The song was popular in 1934. Was not familiar with Robeson singing it.

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